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Author Topic: Re: City of Angles orphanage on Cozumel  (Read 1924 times)
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flopnfly
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« on: May 07, 2006, 08:38:00 am »

I copied this post from Flygt from another board.  Hope you don't mind.      :)  
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
Freedom Ryder
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2006, 11:17:00 am »

Hola
 
 That is very valuable information Heather.
 
 Great idea posting it for all to see.
 
 I am packing Donations for the Cozumel trip so I hope this is one of our stops.
 
 It is amazing all of the useful information Flygt has to share with us for our upcoming trip.
 
 Freedom Ryder  :7:  ...........
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Gambitt
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2006, 11:31:00 pm »

I have a huge selection of stuff here, so I'll be topping up our suitcases.
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flygt
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2006, 05:29:00 am »

Hi Heather, no problem copying the Ciudad de Angeles info over from the other site...anything for the kids.         :)      
 
 The local seafood delicacy and traditional protein staple for thousands of years is caracol, conch meat done up a dozen different ways. You can find it at small national restaurants were you seldom see tourists for really great prices, and occasionally at more expensive eateries.
 
 My favorite is Caracol ceviche, similar to a shrimp coctail and a few cold beers in the early afternoon...not many know how to make ceviche well though and you don't often find it well done in expensive restaurants as it's one of those specialty dishes.
 
 Usually ceviche is served in the seaside palapas or kiosks where mexican tourists and families hang out and usually made by old fishing families. You have to ask around of the locals though to find the good places, there might only be a couple on the island that do it right.
 
 Happy ceviche hunting...but if you can't find caracol, fish or shrimp are excellent as well... ;)      
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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Freedom Ryder
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« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2006, 03:11:00 pm »

OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
 I don't eat seafood.
 
 Hope they have rice and beans, jejejeje.
 
 Freedom Ryder  :7:  .............
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flygt
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« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2006, 03:38:00 pm »

:)   You're in luck Freedom Ryder, you're going to 'rice and beans' heaven...   ;)
 
 Here's a Coz bulletin board that will help you find your way around, get the good deals, find friendly locals, etc;
 
 http://www.cozumel-hotels.net/yabbse/
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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Freedom Ryder
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« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2006, 10:54:00 pm »

Hi Flygt
 
 That is a great link you provided.
 
 Now I am going to be glued to the computer tomorrow reading all of the posts,jejeje.
 
 Freedom Ryder  :7:  ..............
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« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2006, 10:57:00 pm »

Me too Sherry   :D
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flygt
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 12:58:00 am »

No problem, here are a few more Coz specific boards that have some good info and opinions,
 
            http://www.travelnotes.cc/tchatters/search.php?mode=results          
 
                http://www.perspectives.com/forums/forum43/                
 
                http://www.cozumelmycozumel.com/dc/dcboard.php                
 
 Probably the worst of the ripoffs that I've heard happening in Mexico lately to tourists is the 'medical clinic scam', I've read through one report for Coz.
 
 If you don't get hurt or sick then no problem.
 
 Where the scam kicks in is if you have to use an ambulance or get hurt or sick anywhere and have to get to a clinic. These 'tourists clinics' have a standing bounty with ambulance drivers, taxi drivers, police, even local expats etc, they get you in the door, start treating you as quickly as possible, then get you to sign for service and procedures, ask to copy your passport, then present you with a bill for like $4500 USD's for a hangnail or a tourista belly, plus they have your passport to give to the police if it goes that way...my suggestion is to get the info for local Red Cross in town, or find info for any of the other good medical hospitals and facilities way before something happens or even before you get in country.
 
 Lol, never hand your passport to anyone for any reason in Mexico, especially not police, have copies to pass over...if a Mexican cop looks like he's wanting a bribe you should already know what that amount might be...or if you have all the time in world ask for the ticket...    :cool:    
 
 There are several expats living on Coz that can provide private local guiding and help keep you out of trouble with some of the corruption on Coz and can be contacted through some of the BB's I've posted.
 
 This guy, Tony Rome has a good reputation, is owner of a restaurant on Coz and can recommend some good local guides. An American by the name of Richard is one who has a local guiding company for hikes, jeep tours, etc.
 
           http://www.tonyrome.com/          
 
 and owner of this forum as on the other posting;
 
          http://www.cozumel-hotels.net/yabbse/        
 
 Have a great trip.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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flygt
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 02:31:00 am »

THE COZUMEL RED CROSS NEEDS YOUR HELP;
 
 The Cozumel Red Cross is seeking your help in obtaining supplies. They need syringes of all sizes, latex gloves, Ace style knee and ankle braces, stethoscopes, various anti-bacterial ointments and hydrogen peroxide.
 If you are able to bring any of these supplies on your trip to Cozumel, the Red Cross will very much appreciate it.
 Drop in and say hello.
 See what you may be able to do to help.
 
    http://www.islacozumel.net/support/redcross/wishlist.htm  
 
 Cruz Roja (Red cross) 20 Ave entre AR Salas y Calle 1a Sur # 199
 Emergencies : Phone 872-1058 Fax 872-1057
 For Ambulance Dial: 065 from any phone
 
 In addition to disaster relief, the Red Cross provides the only 24-hour ambulance service on the island, vital emergency and clinical services to local citizens and tourists. The Red Cross ambulances are quite a bit less expensive than others available.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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flygt
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2006, 04:34:00 am »

Club Rotario (Rotary Club) of Cozumel has many English speaking members and cordially invite the participation of anyone who wants to attend.
 
 They have a student exchange program, as well as other projects, such as building a shelter for those left homeless after Hurricane Wilma.
 
 The club meets every Thursday at 8:30 pm at the Port Pilot's Office on the corner of Melgar & AP Blvd . Contact Daniel Aranda Santacruz at (044 987) 872-5303 or (044 987 ) 564-0390 (cellular)
 
 Daniel could help get any type of trouble sorted out or have the connections to do so. I'm thinking that you won't need any of this but it never hurts to have connections when traveling.
 
 The protocol to go to a Mexican Rotary club meeting is to phone a day or two in advance in case they are having a closed session, which only happens a couple of times during the year.
 
 Drinks are usually served and one has the oportunity to meet most of the Mexican business people of integrity in town. Dress is evening casual and women are invited.
 
 You don't really need to go to a club meeting though to access local Rotary club and members assistance and the membership generally includes all from doctors to lawyers and builders to mechanics.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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flygt
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« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2006, 02:42:00 pm »

Much of the 'silver' jewelry sold in Mexico by tourist variety shops and beach vendors is Alpaca, German silver, an alloy of copper, nickel and zinc, with no real silver included. One method to determine silver content is to obtain a Silver or Gold/Silver test kit from a lapidary or jewelry supply shop in Canada such as the;
 
  2 in 1 Gold & Silver Test Kit, SILVER TEST: A single drop of our special solution instantly turns blood red on silver. Will not turn red on any other metal. The reliable and safe way to make sure it's silver. Good for testing hundreds of items. Bottle and instructions.
 
 About $25 to $35 per kit.
 
 ...so when the beach vendor starts out at $75 for a nice 'silver' ring and you spend an hour getting the price down to $20 he likely only paid $2 or less for it, cause it probably ain't silver folks.
 
 Quality silver pieces can be found at established jewelry stores but even at those silver plate sometimes shows up. A reputable jeweler will perform any test you want on a piece before purchase though, and some have various types of test kits available, nitric acid, etc, if you know how to use those.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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flopnfly
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« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2006, 08:58:00 pm »

thanks for the info about the silver flygt.
 
 I've read that silver is a popular thing to buy in mexico.
 
 I think I'll stick to the t'shirts.     :D
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Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
flygt
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« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2006, 01:44:00 pm »

Just a reminder about some common Mexican scams, some of these recently heard to be thriving on Cozumel;
 
  The silver coin scam ; somebody such as your cab driver, tour guy, beach vendor, etc comes up and asks if you want to buy some real Mexican silver 'ounce coins' at a discount price, because he needs money for medicine for his ailing grandmother etc...silver ounce coins are a pretty good deal if you like coins and buy them from a Mexican bank when available, but the cab drivers version are likely not silver. If it sounds too good to be true then it's probably not true...Same for gold chains, jewelry, medallions and gold coins...
 
  The police breathalizer scam ; you've had a beer or two at one of the bars on the island and are driving your rental car back to the hotel, you get pulled over and asked to blow by the cop...the result is .09 or something just over the legal limit, which could imply a night in jail, fines, impounding the vehicle etc...or says the cop we can make this problem disappear for about $200 usd's...Don't drink and drive, because even half a beer will get you blowing over the limit, the machine is rigged, you can argue this one down to maybe $200 mn if that's all you show the cop that you have...you should always carry your real money separate from your 'bribe' money.         ;)              ... Or You could just ask the cop for the ticket if you want to get a lawyer, spend some of your days going to court, then going to a bank to pay the fine, then going back to court to get your name taken off the violation list so that you can get your vehicle released from the impound lot after you pay like $500 mn storage charge and maybe another $500 mn towing charge plus the rental on the car didn't stop...Lol, your choice...               ;)              
 
  Fill the car with gasoline scam ; you drive up to the gas station pumps and get inundated by kids asking to wash your windshield, in the meantime the pump attendant starts filling the car except he didn't zero the pump, so you get to pay for your gasoline and the previous car's gasoline as well...forget about the windsheild kids, get out and get to the attendant, check that the pump is starting at zero and ask for a specific amount like $100 or $200 pesos. A locking gas cap is really great to help control this situation.
 
  The rental car gastank scam ; you rent a car and gas gauge reads 'full' but it only has half a tank or less...you can ask the rental place to top up the car right there with a jerry can or ask for an attendant to go with you to double check that it's full, just in case...      ;)      
 
  Just a minute we need to take your credit card to the backroom to check it scam ; be prepared for your card to be photographed and huge charges to your credit card when you get home...I mostly pay for things with cash. You can also phone the credit card company before the trip to limit your liability for credit card ripoffs while traveling. If you need to pull cash from an ATM go to a bank, preferably during bank hours...there are a number of scams and ripoffs associated with ATM's that don't have security cameras. Hotel ATM's are usually OK though.
 
  Getting short changed scam ; lol, we all know that one...don't hand over the bill until the teller counts the change or say what the denomination of the bill is... 'cien' for $100 mn for example as you pass it to the teller, or pay for the item with exact change. $100 mn bills look almost like $1000 mn bills, so don't get confused. USD bills are OK to use and accepted but you'll always get screwed on the exchange rate, expect to lose at least 10% and probably more like 20% buying power if you like USD's.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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flygt
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« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2006, 03:46:00 pm »

A few ways to extend your vacation stay in Mexico         ;)        ;
 
 ...buy some grass or some other kind of drugs from someone in Mexico, either from an undercover cop or from someone like an expat who is being watched by undercover cops or from anyone really.
 
 ...go to a native Mayan archaeological site and pick up some broken pottery shards, obsidian flakes or other artifacts...extra time if you try to take them out of the country, last case that I heard of was a Canadian guy got to stay an additional 3 years.
 
 ...say something derogatory in public or publish something  negative about a Mexican citizen or a Mexican business while in the country, wether true or not.
 
 ...say something derogatory in public or publish something negative about any part, function, official or worker of the Mexican government while in the country, wether true or not.
 
 ...hurt a Mexican, either by doing a bicycle sideswipe with a car or heaven forbid, a fist fight.
 
 cheers,
 Flygt
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